Great Yarmouth Police Station

Overview

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Overview

Nation   England

County   Norfolk

Location   Hall Plain,  Great Yarmouth

Map location   exact or closely approximate

Year opened   1842

Year closed   1879

Century of Operation   1800-1899

Building Type   Police Station, Town Hall

Remarks   Town hall built in 1714. In 1842, the town clerk's office, a small building connected to the town hall, was demolished and a police station with cells and a police court was constructed. The new building formed part of the town hall complex. The new police station replaced an earlier station with cells which were in a poor state. See: https://www.prisonhistory.org/lockup/great-yarmouth-borough-lock-ups/. The town hall was demolished in 1879-80. A new town hall was erected on the same site.

Descriptions

'I inspected these lock-ups, and found them tolerably clean, and without a prisoner.'

Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Eighth Report (Parl. Papers, 1843, XXV. & ; XXVI.249), p.183

'I visited these cells, and found them in no very creditable condition. The walls being disfigured, and in want of whitewash, as they were on my previous visit in March 1845.'

Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Tenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1845, XXIV.1), p.197

'[Inspected October 4th, 1849] It was stated that there had not been any alteration since this lock-up house was last examined by an Inspector of Prisons. The place was in neat order. I was glad to find that there had been a great decrease in the number of prisoners, especially of females, within the last 8 or 9 years ... I suggested to the magistrates the propriety of having the cells warmed.'

Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Fifteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1850, XXVIII.291), p.43

'[Inspected 11th July 1850] There has not been any change in this lock-up house since my Report last October. The suggestion to have the cells warmed has not been acted upon. The place was clean. There were five prisoners, one of whom complained of the cold.'

Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Sixteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1851, XXVII.461), p.161

Featured Images

  • The Police Station Record Room and the Fire Engine House, east side of the Town Hall, Great Yarmouth. Built 1842. Pulled Down 1879-80. Painted in October 1942 from an original sketch taken in 1879Time and Tide Museum Collection (with kind permission of Norfolk Museums Service, Time and Tide Museum)

Description: The Police Station Record Room and the Fire Engine House, east side of the Town Hall, Great Yarmouth. Built 1842. Pulled Down 1879-80. Painted in October 1942 from an original sketch taken in 1879

Photo by: Time and Tide Museum Collection (with kind permission of Norfolk Museums Service, Time and Tide Museum)

SOURCES

    Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Eighth Report (Parl. Papers, 1843, XXV. & ; XXVI.249), p.183
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Tenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1845, XXIV.1), p.197
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Fifteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1850, XXVIII.291), p.43
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Sixteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1851, XXVII.461), p.161

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