Wymondham County Lock Up House

Overview

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Sources

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Overview

Nation   England

County   Norfolk

Location   Bridewell Street  Wymondham

Map location   exact or closely approximate

Year opened   1850

Year closed   unknown

Century of Operation   1800-1899

Building Type   Lock-Up, Prison, Police Station

Remarks   In c.1850, part of Wymondham Bridewell was converted into a lock-up house. Before this date, cells in the prison were used when needed, which brought men into what was meant to be a female house of correction for the county. Wymondham Bridewell was built in 1787 on the site of a previous prison which had been visited and condemned by the penal reformer John Howard in 1779. The new bridewell was designed by a local architect and was used as a model for prisons in Britain and America.

Descriptions

'there is a lock up in Bridewell Street'

Francis White, History, Gazetteer and Directory of Norfolk (Sheffield, 1854), p. 483

'This lock up house ... Has been completed and brought into use. Consequently, no male prisoners whatever are now admitted into the [female] house of correction. This new lock up house contains three cells, which are of a proper size, dry, lighted, warmed and ventilated. There is also an airing yard, and rooms for a resident constable and his wife.'

Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Sixteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1851, XXVII.461), p.163

Featured Images

  • Exterior of the Bridewell at Wymondham, part of which was used as a lock-up. Now a museum. © Neil Haverson (with kind permission)
  • Cell door used from 1810 by prisoners entering the Bridewell© Neil Haverson (with kind permission)
  • Steps by which prison reformer John Howard descended to the dungeon© Neil Haverson (with kind permission)
  • Tableaux of female prisoners in the prison before its reform in the late 18th century© Neil Haverson (with kind permission)

Description: Exterior of the Bridewell at Wymondham, part of which was used as a lock-up. Now a museum.

Photo by: © Neil Haverson (with kind permission)

Description: Cell door used from 1810 by prisoners entering the Bridewell

Photo by: © Neil Haverson (with kind permission)

Description: Steps by which prison reformer John Howard descended to the dungeon

Photo by: © Neil Haverson (with kind permission)

Description: Tableaux of female prisoners in the prison before its reform in the late 18th century

Photo by: © Neil Haverson (with kind permission)

SOURCES

    Francis White, History, Gazetteer and Directory of Norfolk (Sheffield, 1854), p. 483
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Seventeenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1852-53, LII.1), p.78
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Sixteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1851, XXVII.461), p.163

Comments

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