North Shields Police Station and Magistrates Court – Howard Street

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Overview

Nation   England

County   Northumberland

Location   Corner of Saville Street and Howard Street, adjacent to Town Hall,  North Shields

Map location   exact or closely approximate

Year opened   c.1845

Year closed   Unknown

Century of Operation   1800-1899

Building Type   Police Station, Town Hall

Remarks   Grade II listed but listing does not mention cells. Now Hadrian Estates, estate agents

Descriptions

'A new lock up house, of five cells, has been built, forming part of a new town hall and police office. The building stands on a good site... Four of the cells have each a glazed window, looking into the yard belonging to the town hall; but the window of the fifth cell, which, however is but little used, is not glazed, and it has no shutter. All the cells except this are warmed by fires, closed in with grated fenders, as in lunatic asylums. Each cell has a water-closet. There is also a guard bed in every cell, but there is no bedding. The prison is secure. The walls of one of the cells had been much written upon.'

Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain IV. Scotland, Northumberland and Durham, Eleventh Report (Parl. Papers, 1846, XX.461), p.78

'TYNEMOUTH HOWARD STREET (east side) North Shields Borough Treasurer's Department and Magistrate's Court. G.V. II Town Improvement Commissioner's Offices, Savings Bank, Mechanics Institute, Museum and Police Station; taken over as Town Hall 1849. 1844-5 by John Dobson for North Shields Improvement Commissioners...Source: White; Directory of Newcastle etc. 1847. H.E. Craster; History of Northumberland, vol. VIII 1907 p. 352.'

Historic England, National Heritage List for England, 'Borough Treasurer's Department and Magistrates' Court, Howard Street, North Shields', LEN1354989

'Messrs. J. and B. Green of Newcastle, the architects, have contrived that the place in which justice is administered at North Shields, shall be an architectural ornament to the town; for the Town Hall, which was recently erected in Savill Street, is a handsome building in the Elizabethan Style. It is well adapted for the purposes of a Court House, a place of Meeting for the Magistrates and Guardians, and a Police Station.'

William Sidney Gibson, 'A Descriptive and Historical Guide to Tynemouth...'. North Shields: Philipson and Hare, 1849, p.153

Featured Images

  • Former Free Methodist chapel, Howard Street, North Shields (Town hall and courts to right of road sign)Photo © Andrew Curtis (cc-by-sa/2.0)

Description: Former Free Methodist chapel, Howard Street, North Shields (Town hall and courts to right of road sign)

Photo by: Photo © Andrew Curtis (cc-by-sa/2.0)

Description:

Photo by:

SOURCES

    Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain IV. Northern District, Fourteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1849, XXVI.167), p.11
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain IV. Scotland, Fifteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1850, XXVIII.793), p.75
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain IV. Scotland, Northumberland and Durham, Eleventh Report (Parl. Papers, 1846, XX.461), p.78
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain IV. Scotland, Seventeenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1852-53, LII.265), p.90
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain IV. Scotland, Sixteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1851, XXVII.837), p.80
  • Historic England, National Heritage List for England, 'Borough Treasurer's Department and Magistrates' Court, Howard Street, North Shields', LEN1354989

  • https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1354989
  • William Sidney Gibson, 'A Descriptive and Historical Guide to Tynemouth...'. North Shields: Philipson and Hare, 1849. (GoogleBooks)

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