Halliwell Lock-Up

Overview

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Overview

Alternative Names   Halliwell Jail

Nation   England

County   Lancashire

Location   Beneath the Crofters Arms and adjoining cottages, 494 Halliwell Road,  Halliwell, Bolton

Map location   exact or closely approximate

Year opened   Unknown

Year closed   Unknown

Century of Operation   1800-1899

Building Type   Pub and adjoining (police) cottages with cells beneath

Remarks   This listing has several photographs. Please click "View More Images" to see more. It is assumed that the lock-up house mentioned in the Inspectors of Prisons' report of 1847-1848 is the same building as the police house/ Crofters' Arms cellars. However, the network of cells and cellars was apparently more extensive than the 2 cells mentioned in the 1847-1848 report.

Descriptions

'This lock up house, containing two cells, and forming part of the police station, in which a constable resides, is situated about the centre of the town. It is about 6 feet below the street in front, but on a level with the ground at the back. One of the walls is built against the earth, which renders the cells damp. The building belongs to the county. The cells are 9 feet long, 5 1/2 feet wide, 7 feet high, and contain about 350 cubic feet each. The cells open into a sort of scullery, under the keepers kitchen. Thet are quite dark, and the only provision for ventilating is two small openings, one in the wall, and another in the door. They are warmed by means of a steam apparatus, which appears to work quite well. The keeper stated that in ten minutes after he had lighted the fire, the cells were quite warm. The cells are secure. They have guard beds, but no bedding.'

Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain IV. Northern District, Thirteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1847-8, XXXVI.361), p.78

'The Crofters Arms and adjoining cottages on Halliwell Road were built in the early 19th century...The Crofters was used occasionally as a meeting place for the Township Board...In the cellar of the pub and in the adjoining cottages were the cells for prisoners – ‘The Lock-up’...[When the constable] caught the prisoners they would be put in the lock-up until they could be dealt with by the Board...It is believed that the cellars of the Crofters and two of the adjoining cottages [often lived in by policemen] were connected and were used as the lock-up. It is thought that this was the way that the Constable would take to check on his prisoners. When renovation work was taking place at 498 Halliwell Road two doors were removed and taken to Bolton Museum. These doors are approximately seven feet by six feet and have a smaller studded door and a small wooden opening hatch...The door is constructed from wood panels, and has iron studs in it (on the gaoler's side). A square window in the centre has a hatch door attached to it by hinges. There are two latches (top and bottom) opposite main hinges. The door has two iron hinges attached for hanging, with lead around the part of the hinge inserted into the wall, suggesting it came from a stone house....There was also a separate entrance door at the back [of the pub] where the prisoners could be brought in. '

Notes from Margaret Koppens, secretary of Halliwell Local History Society, Bolton

'I believe [the cells] were used by the local law enforcers in the early 1840’s when the top of Halliwell and St Paul’s was built. I read somewhere it was common to have these cells connected to pubs as the pubs doubled up as the community meeting rooms and the likely source of people needing a night in the cells... The cellar in The Crofters was connected to 496-489 (that’s the furthest I know for sure). When 498 and 496 were renovated the remains of the cells were still there and the connecting doors. 2 cells per cellar... Front of the property and below the level of the pavement. So none had windows. Each cellar had a large fireplace towards the rear. They had a studded wooden door approx 5ft 6inch high... [with a] small viewing hatch. '

Notes from a former resident of 498 Halliwell Road

Featured Images

  • Halliwell Jail Door 1 © Bolton Council. From the Collection of Bolton Library and Museum Services
  • Bricked up doorway from Crofter's Arms to neighbouring cottage, Halliwell© Charles Stanford
  • Front of cellar showing old windows (now several feet below ground)© Charles Stanford
  • Crofters Arms, Halliwell © Terry Higginson
  • Halliwell Jail Door 2 © Bolton Council. From the Collection of Bolton Library and Museum Services
  • Passage leading from back door of Crofter's Arms to the cell, Halliwell© Charles Stanford
  • Crofters Arms and adjoining cottage, Halliwell © Terry Higginson
  • Crofters Arms, Halliwell © Terry Higginson

Description: Bricked up doorway from Crofter's Arms to neighbouring cottage, Halliwell

Photo by: © Charles Stanford

Description: Front of cellar showing old windows (now several feet below ground)

Photo by: © Charles Stanford

Description: Crofters Arms, Halliwell

Photo by: © Terry Higginson

Description: Passage leading from back door of Crofter's Arms to the cell, Halliwell

Photo by: © Charles Stanford

Description: Crofters Arms and adjoining cottage, Halliwell

Photo by: © Terry Higginson

Description: Crofters Arms, Halliwell

Photo by: © Terry Higginson

SOURCES

    Notes from Margaret Koppens, secretary of Halliwell Local History Society, Bolton
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain IV. Northern District, Thirteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1847-8, XXXVI.361).

Comments

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