Bridlington Stocks and Pillory

Overview

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Sources

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Overview

Nation   England

County   Yorkshire

Location   Market Place,  Bridlington

Map location   exact or closely approximate

Year opened   1636

Year closed   1835

Century of Operation   1600-1699, 1700-1799, 1800-1899

Building Type   Stocks and pillory

Remarks   No longer in existence. The stocks and pillory beside The Pack Horse, 7 Market Place, are replicas.

Descriptions

'At Bridlington the pillory stood in the Market Place, opposite the Corn Exchange. It was taken down about 1835, and lay some time in Well Lane, but it finally disappeared, and was probably chopped up for firewood. Before its removal there was affixed to it a bell, which was rung to regulate the market hours. Mischievous youths, however, often rang it, so it was taken down in 1810, and kept at a house down a court, known as Pillory Bell Yard.'

William Andrews, 'Bygone Punishments'. London: William Andrews & Co., 1899.

'Wooden stocks and a pillory were placed in Market Place around 1636.Wrongdoers faced public humiliation by being fastened into them and pelted with rubbish by the onlookers. The use of the stocks was abolished in England in 1837 and replicas of the stocks and pillory are now in place in front of the Pack Horse Inn'

Old Town Association, 'Old Town Trail, Bridlington'

Featured Images

  • The Pack Horse, 7 Market Place, BridlingtonPhoto © Jo Turner (cc-by-sa/2.0)

Description: The Pack Horse, 7 Market Place, Bridlington

Photo by: Photo © Jo Turner (cc-by-sa/2.0)

SOURCES

    Old Town Association, 'Old Town Trail, Bridlington'

  • https://www.bridlingtonoldtown.com/docs/bridlington-old-town-trail-yorkshire.pdf
  • William Andrews, 'Bygone Punishments'. London: William Andrews & Co., 1899.

  • http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29117/29117-h/29117-h.htm

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