Bolton Borough Lock-Up

Overview

Sources

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Overview

Nation   England

County   Lancashire

Location   Bowker's Row  Bolton

Map location   exact or closely approximate

Year opened   unknown

Year closed   unknown

Century of Operation   1800-1899

Building Type   Police Station

Descriptions

'The accommodation for the detention of prisoners, previous to their cases being disposed of by the magistrates, consists of two lock-ups; one situate in Bowker's-row, attached to the police station, and the other in the basement of the town-hall at Little Bolton. They were clean and in good order at the time of my visit ... Bowker's-row ... Male cell: length 16 feet 2 inches, breadth 10 feet, height 10 feet; flag floor; boarded ceiling, with guard bed 9 feet 6 inches by 6 feet 3 inches; wall 1 brick thick; wooden benches round the cell; ventilated with iron grating over the door, 3 feet by 2 feet 8 inches. Female cell: length 11 feet, width 7 feet 9 inches, height 10 feet; guard bed, and benches round as above; ventilated with iron grating over the door, 3 feet by 2 feet 8 inches. Both cells heated by Dr Arnot's stoves. ... The roofs of the cells in Bowker's-row lock-up, being simply the floorings of the office above, appear to be wanting in security, and would no doubt be found so, but for the constant presence of the police.'

Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Sixth Report (Parl. Papers, 1841 Session 2, V.1), p.145

'The principal borough lock-up house at Bolton is in [Bowker's-row], near the centre of the town. If forms part of the police office and sessions-house. The site is convenient and unobjectionable. The building is the property of the borough, and is under the jurisdiction of the magistrates. There are three cells, each ... 880 cubic feet. The cells appear to be always dry, and they are secure. They are lighted by grated openings over the doors, and are ventilated partly by these and partly by flues at the back of the cells. They are warmed also by flues. The bedding provided is good and sufficient, and is much better than is usually to be found in police cells or lock-up houses. It consists of straw mattresses and thick rugs. The prisoners have two meals a-day ... I was glad to find that every prisoner is required to wash himself in the morning, a matter too frequently neglected... Though in good order, the place is very faulty in construction, and could not easily be improved.'

Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain IV. Northern District, Thirteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1847-8, XXXVI.361), p.80

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SOURCES

    Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain II. Northern and Eastern District, Sixth Report (Parl. Papers, 1841 Session 2, V.1), p.145
  • Inspectors of Prisons of Great Britain IV. Northern District, Thirteenth Report (Parl. Papers, 1847-8, XXXVI.361), p.80

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